Pride Flags

There are a lot of different pride flags, and learning about them can be a little bit overwhelming at first. This guide aims to introduce you to different flags and serve as a quick reference guide for them.

 

More than rainbows.

Pride flags go far beyond just rainbow stripes. Not only are there many different flags beyond the rainbow flag, pride flags are symbols. They represent specific communities and are a point of pride, letting all loudly (and colorfully) proclaim who they are.

Rainbow Flags

Philadelphia Pride Flag

The Philadelphia Pride Flag is unique for its black and brown stripes. The City of Philadelphia adopted this flag in June 2017 to draw attention to the heightened oppression experienced by queer people of color.

Progress Flag

The Progress Flag is a new take on the Traditional Pride Flag, incorporating the black and brown stripes added in the Philadelphia Pride Flag and pink, white, and blue stripes to represent the trans community. These new stripes are in an arrow to symbolize moving the entire LGBTQ+ community forward.

Baker Pride Flag

Regarded as the first pride flag, the Baker Pride Flag was designed by Gilbert Baker, a gay man from rural Kansas who later lived in San Francisco and New York.

Color meanings: pink (sex), red (life), orange (healing), yellow (sunlight), green (nature), turquoise (magic/art), indigo (serenity), violet (spirit)

Traditional Pride Flag

The Traditional Pride Flag is the most widely used and recognized pride flag. It is used as a symbol of the entire LGBTQ+ community and as an identity-specific flag for people who identify as gay. It was simplified from the original Baker flag due to the shortage of pink fabric used in the original.

Gender Flags

Transgender Flag

The Transgender Flag is used as a symbol of the entire transgender community and as an identity-specific flag for people who just identify as transgender (typically folks who identify on the gender binary).

Color meanings: blue (transmasculinity), pink (transfemininity), white (nonbinary folks)

Nonbinary Flag

The Nonbinary Flag is used as a symbol for the entire nonbinary community and as an identity-specific flag for people who solely identify as nonbinary. Similar to the word transgender, nonbinary is both an umbrella term (comprising of many identities/experiences) and a specific identity. Nonbinary falls under transgender, though not all nonbinary people personally identify as transgender.

Agender Flag

The Agender Flag is a symbol for people who identify as agender/do not identify with any gender.

Bigender Flag

The Bigender Flag is a symbol for people who identify as bigender, meaning they experience two distinct genders. These genders do not have to fall on the gender binary, meaning that one or both could be nonbinary/third genders.

Demiboy Flag

The Demiboy Flag (pronounced demmy-boy) is a symbol for people who identify as demigender/a demiboy. This means someone identifies partially as a man, but not fully. Their gender is 'man-adjacent'.

Demigirl Flag

The Demigirl Flag (pronounced demmy-girl) is a symbol for people who identify as demigender/a demigirl. This means someone identifies partially as a woman, but not fully. Their gender is 'woman-adjacent'.

Genderqueer Flag

The Genderqueer Flag is a symbol for people who identify as genderqueer, meaning their gender is not one specific binary gender. Genderqueer encompasses a wide variety of different gender identities and experiences, and is sometimes viewed as an umbrella term similar to nonbinary.

Genderfluid Flag

The Genderfluid Flag is a symbol for people who identify as genderfluid, meaning they experience a range of different genders. Genderfluidity can include specific genders that one may experience at different times, but it may also be a general experience of fluidity without regard for specific gender identities/experiences.

Intersex Flag

The Intersex Flag is a symbol for people who are intersex, meaning their sex at birth may have been ambiguous. Intersex people may have primary and secondary sex characteristics of both binary sexes. Some intersex choose to also identify their gender (which is different than sex) as intergender, though intersex people identify with a wide range of gender identities and experiences.

Two Spirit Flag

Two Spirit is a gender identity and experience within certain indigenous cultures. Long before the arrival of European colonizers, 'third genders' were recognized by multiple tribes. The two spirit identity never went away, though colonizers enforced a strictly binary view of gender. Note: non-indigenous people should/can not identify as two spirit.

Read about or listen to a two spirit person describe their experiences.

Sexual/Romantic Orientation Flags

Traditional Pride Flag

The Traditional Pride Flag is the most widely used and recognized pride flag. It is used as a symbol of the entire LGBTQ+ community and as an identity-specific flag for people who identify as gay. It was simplified from the original Baker flag due to the shortage of pink fabric used in the original.

Aromantic Flag

The Aromantic Flag is a symbol for people who identify as aromantic, meaning they do not experience romantic attraction. Aromantic people may experience sexual attraction, though they may also identify as asexual. Aromanticism is included in the 'ace spectrum' (short for asexual), a collection of related, though separate, identities.

Asexual Flag

The Asexual Flag is a symbol for people who identify as asexual, meaning they do not experience sexual attraction. Asexual people may experience romantic attraction, though they may also identify as aromantic. Asexuality is included in the 'ace spectrum' (short for asexual), a collection of related, though separate, identities.

Bi Flag

The Bi Flag is a symbol for people who identify as bisexual or biromantic, meaning they experience sexual or romantic attraction towards two or more genders. Bisexuality is considered a 'Middle Sexuality'.

Demiromantic/Demisexual Flag

The Demiromantic/Demisexual Flag (pronounced demmy-romantic or demmy-sexual) is a symbol for people who identify as demiromantic or demisexual. People who are demiromantic/demisexual generally do not develop sexual or romantic attraction towards a person until first forming a close, platonic (non-romantic/friendship) bond.

Lesbian Flag

The Lesbian Flag is a symbol for people who identify as a lesbian, meaning their gender is feminine-aligned and they experience attraction towards others whose genders are feminine-aligned. A synonym for this is sapphic. Someone does not have to identify specifically as a woman to claim the label 'lesbian'.

Pan Flag

The Pan Flag is a symbol for people who identify as pansexual or panromantic, meaning they experience sexual or romantic attraction towards all genders. Some also describe their attraction as being to all people regardless of gender. Pansexuality is considered a 'Middle Sexuality'.

Poly Flag

The Poly Flag is a symbol for people who identify as polysexual or polyromantic, meaning they experience sexual or romantic attraction towards some genders, but not all.

But wait- that's not all.

No single reference guide can list all the different flags that exist. Language around identity is constantly evolving, and so are identity flags. Do you see something missing? Reach out.

The Qube's 2016 Homecoming Parade Float